Myth or Fact

Eating Carrots Will Improve Your Vision

 

Fact : Carrots are high in vitamin A, a nutrient essential for good vision. Eating carrots will provide you with the small amount of vitamin A needed for good vision, but vitamin A isn't limited to rabbit food; it can also be found in milk, cheese, egg yolk, and liver.

 

 

Sitting Too Close to the TV Will Damage Your Vision

Myth : Sitting closer than necessary to the television may give you a headache, but it will not damage your vision. Children, especially if they're nearsighted, may do this to see the TV more clearly. They may, in fact, need glasses.

 

Reading in the Dark Will Weaken Your Eyesight

Myth: As with sitting too close to the television, you may feel eyestrain or get a headache from reading in the dark, but it will not weaken your eyes.

 

Using Glasses or Contacts Will Weaken My Eyesight, and My Eyes Will Eventually Become Dependent On Them

Myth : Your eyes will not grow weaker as a result of using corrective lenses. Your prescription may change over time due to aging or the presence of disease, but it is not because of your current prescription.

Children With Crossed Eyes Can Be Treated

Fact : Children are not able to outgrow strabismus -- the medical term for crossed eyes -- on their own but, with help, it can be more easily corrected at a younger age. That's why it is important for your child to have an eye exam early, first when your child is an infant and then again by age two.

There's Nothing You Can Do to Prevent Vision Loss

 

Myth : At the very first sign of symptoms, such as blurred vision, eye pain, flashes of light, or sudden onset of floaters in your vision, you should see your doctor. If detected early enough, depending on the cause, there are treatments that can correct, stop, or at least slow down the loss of vision.

Using a Nightlight in Your Child's Room Will Contribute to Nearsightedness

 

Myth : It has been thought that using a nightlight in your child's bedroom may contribute to nearsightedness, however there is not enough evidence to support this claim. Keeping a nightlight on in your baby's room may actually help them learn to focus and develop important eye coordination skills when they are awake.